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What Can I Do When My Friend is Depressed?

friend You already know that your school years can be quite complicated and demanding. Sometimes deep down inside you are not quite sure of who you are, what you want to be, or whether the choices you make from day to day are the best decisions. Sometimes the many changes and pressures you are facing seem to overwhelm you. So, it isn't surprising that from time to time you or one of your friends feels "down" or discouraged. But what about those times when a friend's activities and outlook on life stay "down" for weeks and begin to affect your relationship? If you know someone like this, your friend might be suffering from depression. As a friend, you can help.

Understanding Depression

Depression is more than the blues or the blahs; it is more than the normal, everyday ups and downs. When that "down" mood, along with other symptoms, lasts for more than a couple of weeks, the condition may be clinical depression. Clinical depression is a serious health problem that affects the total person. In addition to feelings, it can change behavior, physical health and appearance, academic performance, social activity and the ability to handle everyday decisions and pressures.

What Causes Clinical Depression?

We don't know all the causes of depression yet, but there seems to be biological, hormonal and emotional factors that may increase the likelihood that an individual will develop a depressive disorder. Research over the past decade strongly suggests a genetic link to depressive disorders; in other words depression can run in families. Difficult life experiences and certain personal patterns such as difficulty handling stress, low self-esteem, or extreme pessimism about the future can increase the chances of becoming depressed.

How common is it?

blue girlClinical depression is a lot more common than most people think. It will affect more than 19 million Americans this year. One-fourth of all women and one-eighth of all men will suffer at least one episode or occurrence of depression during their lifetimes. Depression affects people of all ages but is less common for teenagers than for adults. Approximately 3 to 5 percent of the teen population experiences clinical depression every year. That means among 25 friends, 1 could be clinically depressed.

Is it serious?

Depression can be very serious. It has been linked to poor school performance, truancy, alcohol and drug abuse, running away, and feelings of worthlessness and hopelessness. In the past 25 years, the rate of suicide among teenagers and young adults has increased dramatically. Suicide is often linked to depression.

Are All Depressive Disorders Alike?

sad guy No. There are various forms or types of depression. Some people experience only one episode of depression in their whole life, but many have several recurrences. Some depressive episodes begin suddenly for no apparent reason, while others can be associated with a life situation or stress. Sometimes people who are depressed cannot perform even the simplest daily activities -- like getting out of bed or getting dressed; others go through the motions, but it is clear they are not acting or thinking as usual. Some people suffer from bipolar depression in which their moods cycle between two extremes -- from the depths of desperation to frenzied talking or activity or grandiose ideas about their own competence.

Can Depression Be Treated?

sadYes, depression is treatable. Between 80 and 90 percent of people with depression -- even the most serious forms -- can be helped.

There are a variety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapies that can be used to treat depressive disorders. Some people with milder forms may do well with psychotherapy alone. People with moderate to severe depression most often benefit from antidepressants. Most do best with combined treatment: medication to gain relatively quick symptom relief and psychotherapy to learn more effective ways to deal with life's problems, including depression.


The most important step toward overcoming depression -- and sometimes the most difficult -- is asking for help.

Why Don't People Get The Help They Need?

Often people don't know they are depressed, so they don't ask for or get the right help. Teenagers and adults share a problem -- they often fail to recognize the symptoms of depression in themselves or in other people.

Myths, Symptoms, Help and Resources...  Continue >>

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